What a Creativity Coach Does

As I mentioned in previous posts, creativity coaching is a subset of life coaching. But that doesn’t tell you what a coach does or even who they work with.

So let’s address the second question first.

A creativity coach works with creative people. By my definition, that would mean everybody. Since that isn’t possible, let’s narrow it down: artists, writers, composers, dancers, and actors. Just to name a few.

But now what does a creativity coach actually do?

Well…

That’s typically between your coach and you. Each coach has a different take on things and a different specialty. I could go all generic here and talk about creativity coaches in general. But we’re on my blog and talking about something I’m interested in and love to do. So I’m going to be talking about what I would do.

First things first, I would request that you book an initial consultation using the calendar linked here. During that consultation, which would be done via either Skype or Zoom, we would discuss what your issues are and whether we could work together.

Based on that conversation, I would make a recommendation for one of my coaching packages and we would take it from there.

My packages are a combination of email and video or phone chats. You will have a contract and homework to do between sessions. Everything is designed around you and what your goals are.

So while this doesn’t tell you exactly what a coach does, it does provide a framework about how I work so you have some idea of what to expect.

Have you ever worked with a creativity coach before? How was it?

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Ebook vs Print

This has been a question since Amazon came out with the first Kindle. First, I will say that as an author, I will write and publish in both digital and print formats. That’s not what I’m talking about here, though.

I’m talking about what I — and you — prefer to read.

In case you don’t know, I’m legally blind. I have difficulty reading small print, to put it mildly.

I love the feel of physical books. The crispness of the pages. The smell of a new book. The slight resistance of the spine when you open a book for the first time.

You get the idea.

The problem is most books don’t have large print. The ones that do are huge and awkward to read.

I love ebooks. I especially love that I can have hundreds of books on a device in my hand or in my bag. I don’t have to decide which books to take with me on a trip.

I love that I can make the print as large as I need it so I can read comfortably. I also like the option (in many but not all) for it to read a book to me if I’m doing something else or don’t feel like actually reading it myself do some reason.

With print books, I like that I can highlight passages or make notes in the margins. That’s not as easy to do with ebooks.

Do I think ebooks will replace print books? No. I think there will always be a place for both. I don’t think ebooks will ever fully replace hard copies of books.

At least, I don’t think that will happen in my lifetime.

What do you think? Will ebooks replace print books? Which do you prefer?

Blog It All (or Not)

Have you ever started something and you were so excited about it? I’m sure you have.

Then, something about it, maybe the way you bad it set up, made it feel more like a chore. You didn’t look forward to it anymore and you didn’t really want to do it. It wasn’t fun. You only did it because you felt like you had to. It was expected.

That, my friends, is where I had gotten with this blog. I needed something to make me want to do it again.

This weekend, I watched the Launch Bloggers Conference live feed. (I was originally going to go, but couldn’t.) I had a couple Aha! moments while listening to Melissa George and Marisa Mohi. Because of that, I’m making some changes here.

The main thing you’ll notice is frequency. I will no longer be trying to post every day. Instead, you can expect posts every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Beyond that, I will post links to podcast episodes and videos when they go up, most likely on Tuesdays and Saturdays.

I’m also going to make better use of blog categories and tags. Instead of trying to do articles/opinion pieces on things I don’t know enough about, I’ll be talking more about what I know, what I’m working on, and things I use to get my work done.

There will be more behind-the-scenes stuff and explanations of why and how I do things. Instead of talking generically about creativity, I’m going to be showing more about how I use it in my life so I can give practical examples.

I think these changes will make for a more interesting and fun experience for all of us.

I’ll have another post up on Wednesday.

What Do I Pay to Get Published?

It’s often an unasked question, implied instead of direct. Many people don’t want to appear crass or rude by talking about something as obscene as money. (Please read that as tongue-in-cheek as it was intended.)

The question is still there, though. “How much do you pay to get published?”

In the early days of the Internet and before, the answer was usually nothing. “Usually” because although vanity presses and self-publishing did exist, it wasn’t as commonplace.

Now, that answer can be very different. There are a lot of things to consider before putting a book out, whether fiction or nonfiction.

An indie author has to consider whether or not they pay for:

  • Editing.
  • Formatting.
  • Cover art.
  • PR/Marketing/Advertising.

Depending on how you do things, it can get quite pricey.

Right now, I publish through KDP, part of Amazon. There is no cost to me unless or until I purchase actual print copies of my books. That’s how I prefer it.

That said, I am exploring other self-publishing options. There’s nothing wrong with Amazon, but you know the saying about don’t keep all your eggs in one basket? I’m too much in one basket. A little diversity in publishing options would be a good thing.

What about you? In what way(s) do you need to diversify?

A New Challenge

Late last year, I hosted a challenge to help people get out of a creative rut. It seemed to go okay.

Late December, I asked which kind of challenge you would prefer: one to increase your creativity or one to have a better planner. The results were evenly split.

So we’ll do both.

First up is “5 Days to More Creativity.” It starts on January 10, so this is pretty short notice. It will run through the 14th. I will post an image with prompts soon.

Second, “5 Days to a Better Planner” will run from January 21-25. It will be the kick-off event for the launch of a new JEN Enterprises Presents title on how to develop a hybrid planner tailored to your needs.

It’s a busy month. Are you ready to get to work?

What I Write About

I get this question quite a bit when people find out that I write.

“What do you write about?”

The short answer: A little bit of everything.

Or: Whatever needs to be written.

The long answer is more involved. The topic areas I cover (for nonfiction) are creativity, social media, and disability/diabetes. Writing about planning falls under creativity because it can help make room for more creativity in our lives.

When it comes to fiction, I write romance, fantasy, and young adult. Topics vary from project to project.

I also write articles, short stories, and poems. One of my personal projects this year is a daily haiku. You can follow that on my Instagram.

That’s not exactly the full answer, but it’s a good start when it comes to what I write.

My question for you is: What do you prefer to write? If you’re not a writer, what do you prefer to read?

3 Apps for Productivity

I see so many people talk about what apps they use for productivity. So much so that I almost dismissed this idea as a post. But… Here we are.

These are the three apps I use to help keep me on track and productive. Of course, the disclaimer is “when I use them.”

Trello Trello has apps for your desktop and smart phone. You can create lists and have cards for tasks under each list. You can add notes and deadlines to each card. I’ve tried to use Trello before, but now that I’ve figured out how to make it work for me, I love it.

Pomodoro Timer I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of the Pomodoro Technique or not. The idea is you work in 25-minute increments with a 5-minute break. After four of these increments, you can take a longer break. I use this to get started on tasks I really don’t want to do. Once I get in the flow of the work, I ignore the timer and just keep going.

Canva I wish Canva had a desktop option, but it is either web-based or an app for your smart phone. If you need to create infographics, flyers, or social media images (just to name a few) and can’t afford a pricey software, Canva can help you. There are some premium options that you have to pay to use, but it’s very functional even for free

There are several more apps I use for productivity purposes, but these are the three I use most often.

What are your favorite productivity apps?