Are You a Planner?

Once upon a time, there was a girl who didn’t like to plan anything. If she wrote something, she flew by the seat of her pants. (Also known as a panster.) If she  made something, it was the same thing.

One day, a time came where she couldn’t remember what she was going to do. Work was stressful. There was a lot going on there and the pressure of it took its toll on her memory. So she started writing thigns down.

Writing things down led to planning.

The girl was no longer a panster. Oh, sure, she stayed flexible, but she learned the value of planning. And she tried several different planning methods until she found one that worked for her.

Then, due to the fact that there wasn’t a whole lot going on, she stopped planning. Big projects she wanted to do started to suffer and languish for want of attention. She kept getting clues that she needed to start planning again.

The clues got bigger and bigger. Finally, she realized if she kept ignoring the clue sticks, she would soon get hit with the whole clue tree.

It had happened before and signs were pointing to it happening again. Still, she hasn’t et taken time to sit down and plan.

That needs to change.

In case you haven’t figured it out, the “girl” is me. I’ve fallen off the planning wagon. Things are starting to suffer fo it. I have a big project I need to finish but I haven’t. Why? I haven’t sat down and carved out the time to do it. 

I’ve started an Etsy shop. There is a single item in that shop. Why? I haven’t taken the time to take the pictures I need and stock the shop.

What will it take to get all of this done?

Planning.

Since I know this, why do I avoid planning it?

What is something you need to do that you keep avoiding? Hold me accountable to getting my plans written out this weekend and I’ll hold you accountable for whatever it is that you need to get done.

What Are Your Distractions?

A person working on a laptop where you see the laptop and just their hands and forearms.

I can generally work with anything going on. As long as I have headphones or earbuds, I can drown out pretty much any annoying background noises. Sometimes, though, I can’t.

Today is one of those days.

The TV in the next room is too loud. I’m tired and my mind keeps wandering. Random bits of conversation filter through.

What do you do on days where everything is a distraction? What distracts you?

Today, I’m keeping on keeping on. I’m chipping away at my to-do list. I’ve made some phone calls, sent some emails, and now I’m working on this post. Later, I will work on some crochet and do some planning around that.

I have one more phone call to make and some book edits to work on, too. So I would say that despite the distractions, I’m making good progress.

What about you?

Do You Plan Everything?


I don’t know how it’s happened, but I’ve become a planner. I used to be a pantster in just about everything. Not anymore.

In writing circles, a pantster is someone who basically flies by the seat of their pants and doesn’t outline or really even plan anything about their current work in progress. Yes. That was me.

Like I said, not anymore.

If I sit down to write or do any other kind of work, I want to know what it is I’m going to do. More than that, I NEED to know what I’m going to do. I spend too much time playing games or scrolling through Facebook or Instagram if I don’t.

Maybe it’s an age thing? I don’t know. It does seem to go along with age, though. As in, the older I get, the more I need to plan.

That brings me to the point of this post.

What about you? Do you plan everything? Or do you fly by the seat of your pants?

If you are a pantster, do you ever see a time you will become a planner?

Better yet, do you think planning would restrict your creativity too much? That’s probably a question for another blog post, but I’m genuinely interested. Leave me a comment and let me know.

The 5 Second Journal: A Review

I’ve been seeing this journal mentioned all across social media. I caught it on sale and thought I would try it out.

As of right now, I’ve been using it for a little over a week. And I like it.

Developed by Mel Robbins and her team, it plays off of the 5 Second Rule. Count backwards from 5.

5… 4… 3… 2… 1… Get [Stuff] Done!

The journal came wrapped in plastic. It’s an off-set hard cover journal that lies flat. There’s a short introduction that explains some of the science behind it and an example of it’s layout. Then it starts right in.

The top of the page is the setting, followed immediately by how you feel. There’s a space for you to write three reasons for why you feel that way. It’s followed by a space for what you can do to be more energized.

After that, you jump into what I consider the meat of the journal. Your project for the day. This includes why it’s important to you and one thing you can do to move forward. You also decide what time you’re going to quit working for the day. There’s a space for other thoughts in case there’s something that pops up while you’re deciding on your project for the day.

The second page of the daily layout can be used as a calendar/schedule. Or you can ignore the times on the right side and use it just for notes and brainstorming.

It is easy to set up and quit to use. All told, I think I spend less than 5 minutes a day on this. It is not meant to replace your daily planner, but is intended to be a supplement to it.

I like that it’s ease of use lets me focus on what I need to get done. Because you don’t have a lot of room for extra writing, you’re forced to cut through the excess and figure out what is the most important thing to do that day.

In addition to some pictures of the blank journal, I have included a couple images of pages that I have filled out. I think that gives you a better idea of how to use it than just the diagrammed example provided the front of the journal.

Plan Your Writing Schedule (video)

Last week, I shared a video from Sarra Canon of Heart Breathings. This week, I’m doing it again. She has good information for writers, no matter how long you’ve been at it.

In this video, she talks about setting up your writing schedule for 2019 and being realistic about your goals.

Planning for 2019

Creative Commons via catchingcourage.com

It seems strange to think that there are only two weeks left in this year. I actually had to check the calendar after I typed that. Yes. Two weeks.

The other day, I was thinking that it was early to be planning for next year. When I look at the calendar and realize that, though? It’s not too early at all. In fact, I kind of feel some pressure being applied.

But… I’m good.

I don’t have everything in place that I want for 2019, but who does? Not only am I not that organized, I don’t want to be that rigid.

My planner setup for the year is in a purple Carpe Diem A5 6-ring binder. I’m doing a hybrid method using a traditional calendar (week on two pages layout) and Bullet Journal methods. I’ve been giving it a trial run for the past couple months and it’s working out great.

I already have my goals lined up. I will be tracking them per quarter so I’ll better know where I stand with what I’m wanting to do. I won’t share them here just yet. I will let you know some of them as they come along because it involves new books, courses, and reviving my podcast.

It’s more than keeping on keeping on. It’s growing and improving and loving what I do so that I will have more things to share with you, too.

Have you started planning for 2019 yet? What kinds of content do you want to see here (or hear on the podcast) that would help you reach your goals?