Here’s Your Permission Slip

On Monday, at the end of story time, I said you need to give yourself permission to be creative/call yourself a writer.

Well…

I decided some of you might want or need a permission slip. So here you go.

Save it to your computer and print it out. Sign it and date it. Tape it to your monitor or a mirror where you see it frequently.

Give yourself permission.

6 Keys to Creativity: Part 1

Today on the podcast we’re starting a series on the 6 Keys to Creativity that inform how I operate.

Let Me Tell You a Story

Have I ever told you how I started writing? Or anything about my creative journey?

No?

I want to do that now, then.From the time I was about 7 to 16 (I’m guesstimating), my mom was a babysitter. My job, if you can really call it that, was helping to entertain the kids.

That included telling stories.

Even my brother loved my stories and frequently wanted me to tell him a bedtime story.

Eventually, I started writing them down I would also write poems. I was on the school paper and yearbook. But even though I wrote, I didn’t call myself a writer. My writing was mostly just for me at that point.

Don’t get me wrong. I had teachers who encouraged my writing, but those were mostly on school assignments. I didn’t think it was really that big a deal.

Fast-forward to college.

I was waiting for one class to let out so my class could start. I think it was Introduction to Sociology, if I remember correctly. A classmate came and sat by me (on the floor in the hall) to wait, too.

I was reading Writer’s Digest.

Her: “Oh. Are you a writer?”
Me (hesitating): “Yes.”
Her: “What do you write?”

To be totally honest, I don’t remember the rest of our conversation. It was *cough*  years ago.

Why do I remember this much of it?

It was the first time I gave myself permiossion to say I was/am a writer.

This is why I say that you are the only person who says you can or can’t be creative. It’s why I say you have to give ourself permisssion.

No one else can do that.

If you hven’t yet given yerself permission to be creative, to be a writer, to be whatever, do that now.

You might have to do it more than once. That’s OK. Just keep doing it until it sticks.

What a Creativity Coach Does

As I mentioned in previous posts, creativity coaching is a subset of life coaching. But that doesn’t tell you what a coach does or even who they work with.

So let’s address the second question first.

A creativity coach works with creative people. By my definition, that would mean everybody. Since that isn’t possible, let’s narrow it down: artists, writers, composers, dancers, and actors. Just to name a few.

But now what does a creativity coach actually do?

Well…

That’s typically between your coach and you. Each coach has a different take on things and a different specialty. I could go all generic here and talk about creativity coaches in general. But we’re on my blog and talking about something I’m interested in and love to do. So I’m going to be talking about what I would do.

First things first, I would request that you book an initial consultation using the calendar linked here. During that consultation, which would be done via either Skype or Zoom, we would discuss what your issues are and whether we could work together.

Based on that conversation, I would make a recommendation for one of my coaching packages and we would take it from there.

My packages are a combination of email and video or phone chats. You will have a contract and homework to do between sessions. Everything is designed around you and what your goals are.

So while this doesn’t tell you exactly what a coach does, it does provide a framework about how I work so you have some idea of what to expect.

Have you ever worked with a creativity coach before? How was it?

3 Reasons Writers & Makers Use Facebook

I realized a few days ago that I’ve been on Facebook for over ten years. Sometimes I wonder why.

I started out with no purpose other than keeping up with friends and family. Then I decided it would be a good way to promote my writing.

There are several reasons why someone would want to be on Facebook, especially writers and makers. Here are three:

  1. Promote work – Make use of Facebook groups and fan pages to promote your work, whether writing, photography, fiber arts, or whatever you do. You can use your personal profile for this too, but groups and pages give you a wider reach.
  2. Network with others – This is another good use for groups. Also use Facebook Live chats and videos for this. Your profile page is not the best place for this. Frequent groups where people you want to associate with hang out.
  3. Sell work – Several ways exist to do this on the Facebook platform. Your personal page, fan page, Facebook Marketplace, groups, and Messenger are all good for this. You can tie Shopify to your account for selling purposes too.

I know I haven’t covered even half of the reasons why writers and makers might be on Facebook. What is your reason?