5 Themes for the Days of the Week


I know themes are everywhere. Taco Tuesday. Throw-back Thursday. Woman-Crush Wednesday. And so on.
I’ve thought about themes and how they can be beneficial to a creative practice. Here are some themes I’ve been thinking about.

1. Motivational Monday.

There are so many motivational quotes and creativit quotes that could go on this day.

2. Tip Tuesday.

Afer so many years of studying creativity and developing my own theories and ideas, I have a lot of tips I can share.

3. What-if Wednesday

This sounds like it could be a brainstorming day.to come up with more ideas for future projects.

4. Thankful Thursday

In November, a lot of people do a month of Thanksgiving. But why limit it to November? For that matter, why limit it to one day of the week? Of course, it’s not. But it is a day of public gratitude.

5. Focus Friday

I have a friend who does Fnish Friday, where she wraps up ny outstanding projects for the week. I decided to kind of flip that and do a Focus Friday. This day is meant to make a list of what you need to do for the next week to be successful. You don’t have to p lan it out yet unless you do your weekly planning on Fridays, but at least you’ll have an idea of what needs to be done when you sit down TO plan it.

I know I said this was a list of five themes, but we’ve covered everything but the weekend, so….

BONUS:

6. Siesta Saturday

Yes. Siesta. Take a nap. It’s the weekend. There isn’t a law that says you have to run-run-run, go-go-go every single minute. You need to take some time to rest and recharge.

7. Serene Sunday

In our family, Sundays have historically been a quiet day. Church/reflection/quiet time. Whatever you want to do with it. Think about it like the calm before the storm that is the work (or school) week.

Are these themes that work for you? What would you change? Let me know in the comments.

Do You Plan Everything?


I don’t know how it’s happened, but I’ve become a planner. I used to be a pantster in just about everything. Not anymore.

In writing circles, a pantster is someone who basically flies by the seat of their pants and doesn’t outline or really even plan anything about their current work in progress. Yes. That was me.

Like I said, not anymore.

If I sit down to write or do any other kind of work, I want to know what it is I’m going to do. More than that, I NEED to know what I’m going to do. I spend too much time playing games or scrolling through Facebook or Instagram if I don’t.

Maybe it’s an age thing? I don’t know. It does seem to go along with age, though. As in, the older I get, the more I need to plan.

That brings me to the point of this post.

What about you? Do you plan everything? Or do you fly by the seat of your pants?

If you are a pantster, do you ever see a time you will become a planner?

Better yet, do you think planning would restrict your creativity too much? That’s probably a question for another blog post, but I’m genuinely interested. Leave me a comment and let me know.

Do You Wish You Were More Creative?

Sometimes you get stuck in a rut. You think you’re not creative. Or you feel “blocked.” You get frustrated and don’t know what to do next.

Well….

I can help you with that. In more ways than one.

First, I have a few books out that address various aspects of creativity. They’re all linked below with short descriptions of each. Second, you can work with me directly in a coaching situation tailored to exactly what you need. Third, you can join my email list where you will get periodic creativity tips and other updates. I am working on a freebie to offer you when you sign up.

Devoted to Creating: Igniting the Creative Spark in Everyone Everyone who is mae in the image of God is creative. These devotions illustrate how creativity surrounds us and how we cn use it in his service even–and especially–in unexpected ways, such as teaching, parenting, gardening, and cooking, as well as themore expoected outlets of writing, painting, and drawing. Hopefully,. they will help ignite the spark of creativity in you.

80 Creativity Tips 80 Creativity Tips provid a jump-start to sagging creativity and a boost when motivation is low.

Journal Your Way to Creativity Journal Your Way to Creativity is a 90-day self-guided journal designed to help readers tap into their creativity. Some of the promps may sound silly, but some of the silliest prompts tend to be the ones that make you dig the deepest.

Question of the day: What is a service or product that is not listed here that you would be interested in?

5 Reasons to Be Kind to Yourself

I get it. You don’t come to this blog to hear about self-care tips or anything like that. But did you consider that engaging in self-care is important to your creativity?

It is.

Here are five reasons why I believe you shouldn’t ignore self-care. (And I’m talking to myself as much as to you as well.)

1. Stress.

Think about it for a minute. When you;re stressed out, overwhelmed, or sick, your creativity stops. If you view your creativity as just a hobby, you might think this isn’t that big a deal. It’s more important than you realize. Why is the next reason.

2. Creativity itself.

Yes. Creativity itself can be an important part of self-care. If you ignore the creative aspect of our life, you’re cuttig yourself off from a great source of inspiration and relaxation. Even if you’re a professional creative, creativity is an important part of your self-care. Maybe more than if you have a more mundane/traditional 9-5 job.

3. Mental well-being.

I’m not a counselor/psychiatrist and I don’t pretend to be. I haven’t done the research into endorphins or seratonin or anything like that. I’m going based on how it works for me and second-hand reports from friends. Doing something creative can help your mental well-being. Recently, I had to have physicl therapy for tenodonitis in my left wrist. I had talked to the therapist about things I do, including writing and crochet. He said that I might need to slow down for a while, but he wouldn’t ever say I needed to stop completely, especially for something so important to my well-being.

4. Socializing/sense of belonging.

There are some groups that exist around getting together to do or talk about a creative outlet that you enjoy. I am a member of writers’ groups and knitting/crochet groups that get together for this exact reasons/. There are many more, I’m sure, around other creative pursuits. I mention this because although alone-time is good for self-care, so is interaction with other people. Especially if you work alone most of the time.

5. Self-Indulgence.

I hestitated to mention this one. i don’t want you to think that self-care is a bad thing because it encourages selfishness or anything like that. But sometimes the best reason to do self-care is because it’s something you want to do. You want to treat yourself to a mani/pedi or a massage, but such things seem indulgent. So do it. It’s refreshing and you’ll feel better afterward. Feeling better will lead to you doing your work better and being more creative.

I know there are more reasons to do self-care than these, but for the sake of berevity, I thought I would stick with five.

Question of the day: What is your primary reason for prioritizing self-care?

To Pin or Not to Pin

This is something I struggle with. I often forget to pin things to Pinterest, even when it’s in my interests to do so.

It’s often said that pinning items on Pinterest attracts more viewers, readers, or customers. It’s also said that pinned articles have a longer shelf life than those that don’t. I haven’t noticed if either of these are true or not.

However, I don’t yet pin consistently. In a time of making changes to what I do and how I do it when it comes to this blog, this is one more thing I’m changing.

Every time I publish a post, I will pin it. Maybe after a while, I will be able to look at my stats and see a difference.

Riddle me this: Do you use Pinterest for your business/blog/writing? Have you noticed a difference when you do vs when you don’t?

Choosing Pictures for Blog Posts

I thought I would share a little peek behind the scenes and talk about how I choose pictures for blog posts.

First, I start with the topic of the blog post. If it’s a general post, I might just use a picture of me. If it’s about something specific, like this one, I know I need one that’s more relevant.

Second, I will look at the images I already have uploaded to my blog. Sometimes I can reuse one of them. I’ve done that several times. If I don’t find a usable one, I will look in the photo library of pictures I have taken.

If I don’t find a photo I want to use from my files, I have two more options. I can either take a photo or use one from the WordPress library.

It’s easy to get caught up in the image search and spend too much time on it. I’ve actually opted to publish a post without an image if I can’t find one and am short on time. I try not to do that very often, though.

Third, when I have the image in place, I finish the post. I will give it a once-over, set the category and tags, and publish or schedule the post.

That’s a little bit about how I do it things. What about you? Do you always include photos with your blog posts?

January Wrap-Up

Is it just me or was January both the longest and the shortest month ever? I didn’t quite meet all of my goals for the month, but I did pretty good.

My theme for the month was “content.” As in, creating content. To help with this, I participated in the Ultimate Blog Challenge. I ended up not completing the challenge, for a variety of reasons. However, I did get more posts up than I usually do in January. That’s a win itself.

Other things I did for January is

  • 5 Days to Increased Creativity challenge
  • 5 Days to Planner Peace challenge
  • Signed up for and started a Tunisian crochet class with Toni Lipsey of TL Yarn Crafts.
  • Finished two crocheted shawls.
  • Planned out the next JEN Enterprises Presents title (hybrid planning).

January was a challenging month, but it was ultimately a good one. I’ll have another wrap-up at the end of this month too.