I Was Lost, But Now I’m Found

Two notebooks, one purple with a pen clipped to it and one black spiral notebook under the purple one

If there is anything I want to remember, I write it down. I had started an editorial calendar in the purple notebook in this picture.

I finished working in it one day and “put it up.” Okay, let’s be real. I put it in a tote bag that I use a lot.

The tote bag got moved. I have another one I can use. (They call me the bag lady for a reason.) No big deal.

At least, no big deal until I started looking for that notebook.

“Just get another notebook. It’s not like you don’t have enough.”

“Just use your phone like everyone else does. ” (No, nobody really said either of these to me.)

But I needed that notebook because of some things I had written in it. Plus, another notebook was with it. My crochet notebook. I really needed that one too.

And I’ve tried just keeping things in my phone. It doesn’t work for me. There’s something about the contact of pen with paper that I find necessary.

This morning, I saw the original tote bag with both notebooks inside. I feel like I’ve been found.

Or at least part of my brain has been.

Question of the day: Do you write everything down on paper or put it in your phone? Why?

Are You a Crochet Pattern Tester?

That’s what I would like to know. Are you a crochet pattern tester or would you like to be?

A few years ago, I designed a some crochet patterns. I didn’t really know what I was doing and I didn’t know how to find the information I needed at the time, so I stopped.

Now I have access to great resources, including Crochetpreneur Business Academy, and I’ve started again.

I made a prototype of the Double-Layer Crochet Beanie and wrote the pattern. I got it typed and ready to be tested.

That’s where you come in. I need a few people to test it.

How does that work?

I send you a PDF copy of the pattern. You crochet the hat and let me know about any problems, questions, or other comments about it. You would also take some pictures of your finished hat to send to me with permission to use in promoting the pattern. The deadline is September 20 (2019).

What do you think?

Send me an email if you’re interested.

What Are Your Distractions?

A person working on a laptop where you see the laptop and just their hands and forearms.

I can generally work with anything going on. As long as I have headphones or earbuds, I can drown out pretty much any annoying background noises. Sometimes, though, I can’t.

Today is one of those days.

The TV in the next room is too loud. I’m tired and my mind keeps wandering. Random bits of conversation filter through.

What do you do on days where everything is a distraction? What distracts you?

Today, I’m keeping on keeping on. I’m chipping away at my to-do list. I’ve made some phone calls, sent some emails, and now I’m working on this post. Later, I will work on some crochet and do some planning around that.

I have one more phone call to make and some book edits to work on, too. So I would say that despite the distractions, I’m making good progress.

What about you?

A Crapsey … What??


Cinquain. A Crapsey cinquain. Remeber it’s one of the syllabic poetry forms I mentioned in last week’s post.

The Crapsey cinquain was developed by a woman named Adelaide Crapsey, an American poet. As per its name, the cinquain has five lines. The Crapsey cinquain follows a strict syllabic form:

Line 1 – 2 syllables
Line 2 – 4 syllables
Line 3 – 6 syllables
Line 4 – 8 syllables
Line 5 – 2 syllables.

A single siquain can stand on its own or it can be used along with additional cinquains as a stanza of a longer poem.

For one example, you can see “American Princess” in my own poetry collection, Windsong and Other Poems.

Additionally, here is an example just for this. (This is a rough draft and not finished in any way.)

Facebook,
Instagram, and
more social media.
Good or bad, we live our lives
online.

Give it a try. If you feel brave, share yours in the comments below.

Are You a Poet? Do You Know It?

There’s an old joke that says, “I’m a poet and didn’t know it. You can tell by my feet. They’re Longfellows.”

I got started on my writing journey with poetry. I wrote my first poem in high school. In tenth grade English, we had to keep a journal. I wrote my first poem there. I got brave and showed it to my 11th grade English teacher. She said I had a “great talent” and shouldn’t let it go to waste.

It took too many years before I gave myself permission to say I was a writer. But that’s not the point here.

My poems don’t usually rhyme. I don’t use iambic pentameter or any other formal poetic form or meter.

Some time ago, I was introduced to syllabic poetry. I took a poetry-writing class at through the public education program at the local college. Since then, I’ve used several syllabic forms in my poems.

What is syllabic poetry?

Syllabic poetry has a set number of syllables per line. It can be set by the writer or by a specific form.

Some syllabic poetry forms include:

  • Crapsey cinquain
  • Rondelle
  • Haiku/senryu
  • Tanka

There are many more.

I’ve decided I want to get back to my roots, so to speak, and write more poems again.

I’m going to share some of what I learn here and on my YouTube channel.

What is one of your favorite types of poems?

Happy Anniversary to Me 🎉

I don’t usually post on weekends, but I remembered something today. I signed up on WordPress seven years ago. Before that, I had a sporadic blog on Blogger. I haven’t always been consistent, but I’m learning and improving. I hope I’ve provided some value and, maybe, useful information along the way.